Activity fuel

n. Wildland fuel created as a result of a land management activity.

 

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One side effect of many land management activities is an increase in the amount of available fuel. For example, branches and unmerchantable bolewood left on site after timber harvesting (slash) is the quintessential activity fuel. Other land management activities, such as pruning, herbicide application, non-commercial thinning, and even prescribed burning, also create activity fuel.

 

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Although prescribed burning immediately reduces available fuel, in some cases the fire causes mortality of branches or whole trees. The fire-killed biomass eventually becomes surface fuel as it falls to the ground. Technically, fire-killed biomass constitutes activity fuel because it is created as a result of a land management activity.