Soil heating

n. An increase in soil temperature as a result of heat transfer from the combustion of surface fuel and smoldering combustion of organic soil horizons.  

 

  • Discussion

 

Because of the variability of fuel consumption, soil heating typically is non-uniform across landscapes. In many cases, the highest soil temperatures are associated with high fuel consumption and/or complete duff consumption. Under these circumstances, the duration and intensity of burning are affected. See Bauder (2000), Campbell and others (1990), Campbell and others (1992), and Peter (1992) for further discussion.

 

  • See Also

  • References

    • Bauder, Jim. 2000. What does fire do to your soil? Montana State University Communications Services. [Online]. Available; http://www.montana.edu/wwwpb/ag/firesoil.html.

    • Campbell, G.S.; Jungbauer, J.D. Jr.; Bristow, K.L.; Bidlake, W.R. 1992. Simulation of Heat and Water Flow in Soil under High Temperature (Fire) Conditions. Pullman, WA: Washington State University, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences; Report prepared for the Intermountain Fire Sciences Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Missoula, MT, p. 1-6.

    • Campbell, G.S.; Jungbauer, J.D. Jr.; Bidlake, W.R. 1990. Linked Transport of Heat and Water in Soil Under High Temperature (Fire) Conditions. Pullman, WA: Washington State University, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences; Report prepared for the Intermountain Fire Sciences Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Missoula, MT, p. 1-4.

    • Peter, S.J. 1992. Heat Transfer in Soils beneath a Spreading Fire.  NB, Canada: Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Brunswick. Thesis, p. 1-20.

     

  • Notes

    • Author 

      Dan Jimenez, Research Engineer

      Rocky Mountain Research Station